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General Dog Care

General Dog Care

By on Jan 6, 2014 in Education, Featured | 0 comments

Experts say that dogs were domesticated between 12,000 and 25,000 years ago—and that all dogs evolved from the wolf. Since then, humans have selectively bred more than 400 breeds, ranging in size from four-pound teacup poodles to Irish wolfhounds, whose three-foot stature earns them the title of tallest canine. But the most popular pooches are non-pedigree—the one-of-a-kind dogs known as mixed-breeds. Cost The annual cost of a small dog—including food, veterinary care, toys and license—is $420. Make that $620 for a medium dog and $780 for a large pooch. This figure doesn’t include capital expenses for spay/neuter surgery, collar and leash, carrier and crate. Note: Make sure you have all your supplies (see our checklist) before you bring your dog home. Basic Care Feeding – Puppies 8 to 12 weeks old need four meals a day. – Feed puppies three to six months old three meals a day. – Feed puppies six months to one year two meals a day. – When your dog reaches his first birthday, one meal a day is usually enough. – For some dogs, including larger canines or those prone to bloat, it’s better to feed two smaller meals. Premium-quality dry food provides a well-balanced diet for adult dogs and may be mixed with water, broth or canned food. Your dog may enjoy cottage cheese, cooked egg, fruits and vegetables, but these additions should not total more than ten percent of his daily food intake. Puppies should be fed a high-quality, brand-name puppy food. Please limit “people food,” however, because it can result in vitamin and mineral imbalances, bone and teeth problems and may cause very picky eating habits and obesity. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times, and be sure to wash food and water dishes frequently. Exercise Dogs need exercise to burn calories, stimulate their minds, and keep healthy. Exercise also tends to help dogs avoid boredom, which can lead to destructive behaviors. Supervised fun and games will satisfy many of your pet’s instinctual urges to dig, herd, chew, retrieve and chase. Individual exercise needs vary based on breed or breed mix, sex, age and level of health—but a couple of walks around the block every day and ten minutes...

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Life with your Newly adopted Dog

Life with your Newly adopted Dog

By on Jan 4, 2014 in Education, Featured |

Bringing a new dog home from an animal shelter is an exciting experience. Dogs can bring a lot of joy and energy into a household, quickly becoming a treasured member of the family. Adjusting to life with a newly adopted dog is not always smooth sailing, as members of the household often deal with a transition period as they grow more acclimated to the responsibility of pet ownership. Sometimes this transition is easy, while other times it can be more complicated. The following are a few tips to help new dog owners make their transition to pet ownership go more smoothly. * Emphasize routine. Routine makes dogs more comfortable, and this can make things easier on new dog owners. Get up and go to bed at the same time each day, and schedule walks and play time at the same time each day as well. As the dog grows more acclimated to your home, you can gradually vary your own schedule, but try to stick to the walking and playtime schedule for your dog as much as possible. Anxiety is a significant issue for many shelter dogs, but sticking to a routine can help lower that anxiety significantly. * Visit the veterinarian within days of the adoption. A visit to the vet is necessary even if your dog has received all of its necessary vaccinations. The vet can examine the dog and give advice on diet and exercise, which is especially valuable information for those owners who have never before owned a dog. In addition, a vet might direct men and women who adopted a purebred to a colleague who specializes in that particular breed. Such vets may be more specific when recommending a diet or exercise regimen, which can help the dog’s long-term health. * Gradually alter diet. Many shelter dogs were on poor diets before they came to the shelter, and the shelter or your veterinarian might suggest changing that diet. Adapting to a new diet won’t necessarily be easy for your dog, but gradual changes often ease this transition. For example, if the dog’s diet must change completely, don’t change it all in one day. Gradually mix old food with the new food over the course...

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